Tag Archives: Soccer

Study reveals the personality of Brazilian soccer teams

Flamengo's blazon by George Vale/Flickr

 

If the main Brazilian soccer teams were people, Corinthians and Flamengo would be a brave and joyful youngster, while Botafogo and São Paulo would be reliable, polite, sophisticated middle aged men.

GfK, an important market research specialist, interviewed 1.000 Brazilians in 12 major cities for the study “Patrocínio de Futebol e Personalidade de Marca” (Soccer Sponsors and Brand Personality). They had to associate a list of qualities to the name of the main 11 teams – Atlético Mineiro, Botafogo, Corinthians, Cruzeiro, Flamengo, Fluminense, Grêmio, Internacional, Palmeiras, Santos, São Paulo and Vasco. They were supposed to describe both the teams they supported and others. Continue reading Study reveals the personality of Brazilian soccer teams

Brazil explained in 100 images (Part 9)

[UPDADE] – You have the option of seeing all the 100 images in only one post. Click here.

Enjoy this tour of 150 years of Brazilian history through photography and other iconography. Ten Fridays, ten pictures each. You can read the other chapters here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8 and Part 10.

Chacrinha, the psychedelic king of Brazilian TV, and his voluptuous chacretes in the seventies.

Continue reading Brazil explained in 100 images (Part 9)

Brazil explained in 100 images (Part 8)

[UPDADE] – You have the option of seeing all the 100 images in only one post. Click here.

Enjoy this tour of 150 years of Brazilian history through photography and other iconography. Ten Fridays, ten pictures each. You can read the other chapters here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 9 and Part 10.

Cacilda Becker, that many consider the best Brazilian actress of all times.

Continue reading Brazil explained in 100 images (Part 8)

Brazil explained in 100 images (Part 7)

[UPDADE] – You have the option of seeing all the 100 images in only one post. Click here.

Enjoy this tour of 150 years of Brazilian history through photography and other iconography. Ten Fridays, ten pictures each. You can read the other chapters here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 8 and Part 10.

Oscarito and Grande Otelo, the duo of comic artists that marked the golden days of Atlântida, the main Brazilian film producer in the 50s. Here they perform in "De Pernas pro ar", 1957.

Continue reading Brazil explained in 100 images (Part 7)

Marta, world's best soccer player

Five times elected the best. Photo by americanistadechiapas/Flickr

Forget Kaká (midfielder now playing for Real Madrid). This week’s Newsweek magazine brings an article by Mac Margolis glorifying another Brazilian soccer player: Marta Vieira da Silva (or simply Marta). She plays for the Western New York Flash and won last month, for the fifth time in a row, the Ballon d’Or, award created by Fifa (the international soccer federation) to celebrate the best of the best in the sport.

Says Margolis:

What makes her stand out is something else, less photogenic perhaps but every bit as compelling. Call it heart or grit or fome de bola—ball hunger—as the Brazilians put it. Whatever the name, the sheer determination to play and prevail against ridiculous odds lifted her from kick-abouts with the boys on a patch of Brazilian nowhere to the commanding heights of professional football. “No one wants to win as much as Marta,” says Alberto Montoya, who coached her for the San Francisco Gold Pride, the team she led to a Women’s Professional Soccer (WPS) league championship in 2010. “She’s the most passionate player I have ever seen.”

You can read the whole article in Newsweek’s portal.

Marta, world’s best soccer player

Five times elected the best. Photo by americanistadechiapas/Flickr

Forget Kaká (midfielder now playing for Real Madrid). This week’s Newsweek magazine brings an article by Mac Margolis glorifying another Brazilian soccer player: Marta Vieira da Silva (or simply Marta). She plays for the Western New York Flash and won last month, for the fifth time in a row, the Ballon d’Or, award created by Fifa (the international soccer federation) to celebrate the best of the best in the sport.

Says Margolis:

What makes her stand out is something else, less photogenic perhaps but every bit as compelling. Call it heart or grit or fome de bola—ball hunger—as the Brazilians put it. Whatever the name, the sheer determination to play and prevail against ridiculous odds lifted her from kick-abouts with the boys on a patch of Brazilian nowhere to the commanding heights of professional football. “No one wants to win as much as Marta,” says Alberto Montoya, who coached her for the San Francisco Gold Pride, the team she led to a Women’s Professional Soccer (WPS) league championship in 2010. “She’s the most passionate player I have ever seen.”

You can read the whole article in Newsweek’s portal.

Brazil explained in 100 images (Part 3)

[UPDADE] – You have the option of seeing all the 100 images in only one post. Click here.

Enjoy this tour of 150 years of Brazilian history through photography and other iconography. Ten Fridays, ten pictures each. You can read the other chapters here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9 and Part 10.

Santos Dumont tests his first heavier than air airplane, the 14 Bis, with the help of a donkey and steel cables. Circa 1906

Continue reading Brazil explained in 100 images (Part 3)

5 faux-pas in the land of laissez-faire

by procsilas/Flickr

Even in a country prone to informality, such as Brazil, certain attitudes or habits may stir controversy or criticism. Before you cross the line and step on somebody’s toe, check these big no-nos:

  1. Soccer – When I met my husband, Lenny, who’s American, I told him that, as an honorary Brazilian, he was supposed to choose a soccer team to support. He told me to ask my father’s opinion on this relevant subject. My dad’s answer: “on one hand, you have a certain Italian vibe, so you might support Palmeiras. On the other hand, you are not snobbish and like to blend in, so you might go for Corinthians”. Naturally, he suggested teams from São Paulo, where we come from. Wisely, my husband, answered: “ok, but which is your dad’s team?” Since my father is corintiano, Lenny followed his lead.  It is easy to incur in a faux-pas in this arena. So, check if your friends or colleagues are passionate about a certain team before bashing it. Also, be extremely cautious if you decide to wear a team’s official t-shirt. Imagine this scenario: you are walking past a stadium. The game is over and you are spotted by the opposing team. Things could get ugly. Continue reading 5 faux-pas in the land of laissez-faire

Brazil in numbers

From  useful to futile, numbers that help explaining the country.

  • 43% of adults that live in state capitals are overweight.
  • Those who have access to the internet spent 2.8 days connected in the month of September.
  • 9% of the kids born in 2008 were not registered.
  • 473 million reais ( 256.6 million dollars or 184.5 million euros) were collected by the government of the city of São Paulo thanks to driving and parking tickets. 99% of the Brazilian cities have budgets lower than that.
  • 57% of the inhabitants of the city of São Paulo would like to move away (Is this related to the previous number? Maybe).
  • Brazil is the 88th country in the education ranking produced by Unesco. Paraguay and Bolivia are in better shape.
  • 1 in 5 Brazilians that have a formal job works for the public service.
  • President Lula spent 87 days abroad in 2009 – a personal record.
  • 9 in 10 Brazilians have a cell phone.
  • 500 million reais (271.3 million dollars or 195 million euros) will be spent to fix up Maracanã stadium, in Rio, for the 2014 World Soccer Cup.
  • The Brazilian delegation to the UN Climate Summit in Copenhagen last December had 743 members. It was three times bigger than the American delegation.
  • 1819 houses and buildings at Brazilian roadsides have been used for child prostitution. It’s one every 27 kilometers.

Source: recent editions of Veja magazine