Tag Archives: Amazonas

Coretos, Brazilian bandstands

Olinda, in Pernambuco state. Photo by Prefeitura de Olinda/ Flickr

Almost all Brazilian cities were constructed around a central square which generally includes the main church or cathedral, gardens, cement benches, a fountain and, in many cases, also the city hall and a prison. Frequently, there is also a bandstand that may host musical shows or political speeches. Check some of these cool examples of bandstands – coretos in Portuguese – and feel the nostalgia.

Olinda once again. Another promotional photo by Prefeitura de Olinda/Flickr


Praça do Ferreira, in Fortaleza, capital of the state of Ceará, in the twenties. Photo from Wikipedia


Praça Batista Campos, in Belém, capital of the state of Pará. Photo by Papy Leite/ Flickr


This and the following photo were taken at Praça da Polícia (Police Square) in Manaus, capital of Amazonas state. Photo by ACMoraes/ Flickr

Photo taken in Rio by Thiago Melo


Avaré, state of São Paulo. Photo by José Reynaldo da Fonseca/ Wikipedia

You can check for some other examples here.


Brazilian volcanoes

Trindande and Martim Vaz Archipel

If you ask a Brazilian if his country has any volcanoes, he will answer with a very solid no. He will even tell you a very popular joke about that.

Once upon a time, God was showing an angel around the brand new Earth. “This is Indonesia – they will have tsunamis and volcanoes. And this is the US – they will have hurricanes and earthquakes”, he says. The angel points to Brazil: “what about this country?”. God answers that Brazil will have the best weather of the planet, no volcanoes or earthquakes, a real paradise. The angel scratches his halo and asks: “How come everything is so great there?”, to what God answers: “Just wait to see the people I will put there!”

This joke, told whenever a Brazilian is in a self-deprecating mood, reinforces a stereotype that is only partially true. Check the image I chose to open this post. This is Trindade island, a stone wall of volcanic origin off the coast of Espírito Santo state. It’s cliffs are so steep that only crabs and spiders are able to survive there. Many ships that tried to go there sank and the only safe way to reach it is by helicopter. Trindade is the living proof that even if Brazil is safer than the average, it is not 100% immune to natural catastrophes. Continue reading Brazilian volcanoes